Search Results for Levi-Civita


Biographies

  1. Levi-Civita biography
    • Tullio Levi-Civita .
    • Tullio Levi-Civita's father was Giacomo Levi-Civita who was a lawyer.
    • Two of his teachers were Giuseppe Veronese and Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita later collaborated with the latter.
    • By putting together Ricci-Curbastro's algorithm with some results from Lie's theory of transformation groups, Levi-Civita extended the theory of absolute invariants to more general cases than those considered by Ricci-Curbastro.
    • Levi-Civita was appointed to the Chair of Rational Mechanics at Padua in 1898, a post which he was to hold for 20 years.
    • In particular in 1909 Castelnuovo tried hard to persuade him to move, but Levi-Civita was happy to remain in Padua.
    • Levi-Civita was a pacifist with firm socialist ideas and it may well have been that he felt Padua suited his personality better than Rome at the time.
    • Levi-Civita was always very international in his outlook and the ability of Rome to attract top quality students from abroad must have figured in his reasons to now want to make the move there.
    • Levi-Civita was opposed to such ideas as he made clear in a letter he wrote to Sommerfeld in 1920:- .
    • When Von Karman approached Levi-Civita in 1922 suggesting a scientific meeting on fluid dynamics he knew that such a meeting could not be an official congress if German and Italian scientists were both involved so he proposed an informal one.
    • Levi-Civita was enthusiastic but when the meeting took place in Innsbruck in September of that year the only scientists from the Allied Powers to participate were Levi-Civita and members of his research group.
    • Levi-Civita's role is described in detail by Battimelli in [Riv.
    • Tullio Levi-Civita was one of the leading figures in the creation, in the years following World War I, of the International Congresses of Applied Mechanics, and remained an active member of the Congress committee to the end of his life.
    • Levi-Civita [made a major] contribution to the life of the Congresses, from the early days of the 1922 Innsbruck conference to the late thirties [with] his role in the international network created by the newborn institution ..
    • It was not just the international situation which gave Levi-Civita problems but also the effect of totalitarianism and anti-Semitism on scientific and university life.
    • Although he was deeply opposed to such ideas, Levi-Civita felt that for the sake of his family and his research school in Rome he had to sign despite his strong moral objections.
    • Later in 1936 the International Mathematical Congress was held in Oslo but Levi-Civita, and all other Italian mathematicians, were forbidden to attend by their government.
    • Despite this Levi-Civita was appointed as a member of the Commission for awarding Fields Medals.
    • Levi-Civita was dismissed from his professorship, forced to leave the editorial board of Zentralblatt fur Mathematik, and prevented from attending the Fifth International Congress of Applied Mechanics in the United States.
    • In the last years of his life, in spite of his moral and physical depression, Levi-Civita remained faithful to the ideal of scientific internationalism and helped colleagues and students who were victims of anti-Semitism; thanks to him, many of them found positions in South America or in the USA.
    • Levi-Civita had very great command of pure mathematics, with particularly strong geometric intuition which he applied to a variety of problems of applied mathematics.
    • The paper was requested by Klein when he met Levi-Civita in Padua in 1899 and, following Klein's wishes, it appeared in Mathematische Annalen.
    • Weyl was to take up Levi-Civita's ideas and make them into a unified theory of gravitation and electromagnetism.
    • Levi-Civita's work was of extreme importance in the theory of relativity, and he produced a series of papers elegantly treating the problem of a static gravitational field.
    • This topic was discussed in a correspondence between Levi-Civita and Einstein.
    • the main mathematical and physical questions discussed by Einstein and Levi-Civita in their 1915 - 1917 correspondence: the variational formulation of the gravitational field equations and their covariance properties, and the definition of the gravitational energy and the existence of gravitational waves.
    • Analytic dynamics was another topic studied by Levi-Civita, many of his papers examining special cases of the three-body problem.
    • In 1950 (nine years after his death) a book by Levi-Civita entitled Le probleme des n corps en relativite generale was published.
    • In [Italian mathematics between the two world wars (Pitagora, Bologna, 1987), 125-141.',18)">18] the authors argue that Levi-Civita was interested in the theory of stability and qualitative analysis of ordinary differential equations for three reasons: his interest in geometry and geometric models; his interest in classical mechanics and celestial mechanics, in particular, the three-body problem; and his interest in stability of movement in the domain of analytic mechanics.
    • Levi-Civita's interest in hydrodynamics began early in his career with his paper Note on the resistance of fluids appearing in 1901.
    • 18 (5) (1996), 245-268.',33)">33] Levi-Civita's work with his student L S Da Rios on three-dimensional vortex filament dynamics is discussed in detail.
    • Levi-Civita's work on asymptotic potential for slender tubes is at the core of the mathematical formulation of potential theory and capacity theory.
    • In 1933 Levi-Civita contributed to Dirac's equations of quantum theory.
    • The Royal Society conferred the Sylvester medal on Levi-Civita in 1922, while in 1930 he was elected a foreign member.
    • A Poster of Tullio Levi-Civita .
    • Levi-Civita: Absolute Differential Calculus .
    • Levi-Civita: Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto .
    • Honours awarded to Tullio Levi-Civita .
    • Lunar featuresCrater Levi-Civita .
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Biographies/Levi-Civita.html .

  2. Levi Beppo biography
    • Levi signed the counter-manifesto, as did Leonida Tonelli, Vito Volterra, Guido Castelnuovo, Tullio Levi-Civita and Francesco Severi.

  3. Nalli biography
    • The leading mathematicians of the day were members, for example in the early years of the 20th century Henri Poincare, Jacques Hadamard, David Hilbert, Vito Volterra, Federigo Enriques, Guido Castelnuovo, Corrado Segre, Giuseppe Peano, Tullio Levi-Civita, Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro and Luigi Bianchi were members.
    • However, despite being ranked first, Pavia did not appoint Nalli to the chair and she wrote a strong letter of complaint to the rector of the university as well as writing to Tullio Levi-Civita complaining bitterly about the injustice.
    • She complained to Levi-Civita about (see [Dizionario Biografico degli Italiani 77 (2012).',4)">4]):- .
    • We do not know what reply she had from Levi-Civita but he seems to have given her encouragement since, in February 1927, she was took up an appointment as professor at the University of Catania.
    • However, the greatest indication of the reply Nalli must have received is seen from the fact that at this time she changed her research topic and after this worked on tensor calculus, the topic for which Levi-Civita is famed.
    • Her first publications on this new topic were Sul parallelismo di Levi-Civita e sopra certe possibili estensioni (1928) and Parallelismo e coordinate geodetiche (1929).

  4. Schouten biography
    • In 1915 he discovered the Levi-Civita connection in Riemannian manifolds independently of Levi-Civita but since his paper only appeared in 1919, a year later than Levi-Civita's, he received no credit.
    • Up to the point when he saw Giovanni Ricci's and Tulio Levi-Civita's work, Schouten's notation had been, by his own admission, difficult to understand but, once he saw their notation he accepted it immediately as simpler than his own.
    • Although both authors appear on both volumes (each dedicated to Tullio Levi-Civita), the first volume is largely the work of Schouten while the second is largely the work of Struik.

  5. Ricci-Curbastro biography
    • Much of Ricci-Curbastro's work after 1900 was done jointly with his student Levi-Civita.
    • In the paper, applications are given by Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita to the classification of the quadratic forms of differentials and there are other analytic applications; they give applications to geometry including the theory of surfaces and groups of motions; and mechanical applications including dynamics and solutions to Lagrange's equations.
    • 1 (1926), 555-567.',7)">7], written by Ricci-Curbastro's student Levi-Civita, lists sixty-one of his publications.

  6. Dubreil-Jacotin biography
    • She met Emmy Noether, who she would later pay tribute to in her article Portraits of women mathematicians, and in Rome during the winter term of 1930-31 she met Levi-Civita who was working on similar problems in fluid mechanics which interested her [l\'Annuaire des Anciens Eleves de l\'Ecole Normale Superieure (1972).
    • Levi-Civita, surprised and interested, encouraged her to continue her studies.
    • She established the existence of an infinity of waves, those of Gerstner and Levi-Civita being two examples.

  7. Vitali biography
    • The referees were Guido Fubini, Tullio Levi-Civita, Salvatore Pincherle, Leonida Tonelli and Gabriele Torelli.
    • In fact Vitali was only ranked as second choice by the referees (although Fubini and Levi-Civita had ranked him top), but the candidate who came top, Gustavo Sannia, did not accept the post when offered it.

  8. Abraham Max biography
    • Disliking the small university atmosphere of Illinois, he returned within a few months to Gottingen, going next to Italy at the invitation of Levi-Civita.
    • Einstein also argued about relativity in a correspondence with Levi-Civita and Abraham played a role in this argument too, see for example [Italian mathematics between the two world wars (Bologna, 1987), 143-159.',4)">4].

  9. Christoffel biography
    • He wrote important papers which contributed to the development of the tensor calculus of C G Ricci-Curbastro and Tullio Levi-Civita.
    • Indeed this influence is clearly seen since this allowed Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita to develop a coordinate free differential calculus which Einstein, with the help of Grossmann, turned into the tensor analysis mathematical foundation of general relativity.

  10. Vranceanu biography
    • In Rome Vranceanu studied under Levi-Civita, obtaining his doctorate on 5 November 1924 for a dissertation Sopra una teorema di Weierstrass e le sue applicazioni alla stabilita which gave a new proof of a theorem on the decomposition of analytical functions of more variables and also studied applications of the theorem to mechanics.
    • Vranceanu returned to Iasi and, in 1926, still developing ideas suggested by Levi-Civita, Vranceanu discovered the notion of a non-holonomic space.

  11. Davies biography
    • The leading expert on the absolute differential calculus was Tullio Levi-Civita who lectured in Rome, so in August 1926, following Dienes' advice, Davies travelled to Rome.
    • This was the first visit of many that Davies made to Rome where, as intended, he studied under Levi-Civita.

  12. De Franchis biography
    • The leading mathematicians of the day were members, for example in the early years of the 20th century Henri Poincare, Jacques Hadamard, David Hilbert, Vito Volterra, Federigo Enriques, Guido Castelnuovo, Corrado Segre, Giuseppe Peano, Tullio Levi-Civita, Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro and Luigi Bianchi were members.
    • He was able to get support for his position from many leading mathematicians such as the Germans Edmund Landau and Hermann Weyl, the Frenchmen Maurice Frechet and Jacques Hadamard, the American George D Birkhoff, and the Italians Gaetano Scorza, Luigi Bianchi, Tullio Levi-Civita, Francesco Severi, and Vito Volterra.

  13. Segre Beniamino biography
    • By this time he, along with Tullio Levi-Civita, were managing the journal Annali di Matematica and, also in October 1938, both were relieved of their positions (Levi-Civita was also Jewish).

  14. Cherubino biography
    • These were Giuseppe Veronese, who held the Chair of Algebraic Geometry, Tullio Levi-Civita, who had been appointed to the Chair of Rational Mechanics in 1898, a post which he held for 20 years, and Francesco Severi, who had been appointed to the Chair of Projective and Descriptive Geometry in 1905.
    • Cherubino was awarded a government scholarship for advanced study which allowed him to attend the courses of Levi-Civita and Veronese while, advised by Severi, he devoted himself to the study of algebraic geometry.

  15. Sundman biography
    • ',2)">2] Dell'Aglio looks at the approaches of Levi-Civita, Painleve and Sundman to the three body problem which:- .
    • it is possible to show the existence of two different research programs, one related to Levi-Civita's works, the other to Sundman's investigations, which include for the first time a complete regularization of the three-body problem.

  16. Yano biography
    • He entered the university and, together with some fellow students who also were keen to learn about differential geometry and Riemannian geometry, he studied some of the major texts such as those by Schouten, Weyl, Eisenhart, Levi-Civita and Cartan.
    • He was in Korea for the Symposium on Differential Geometry at Seoul and Kyunpook Universities from 14 to 18 September, then he was in Rome to celebrate the 100th birthday of Levi-Civita at the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei in December.

  17. Fermi biography
    • After the award of his doctorate Fermi returned to Rome and began working with the mathematicians there, particularly Castelnuovo, Levi-Civita and Enriques.
    • It is worth noting that both Levi-Civita and Volterra supported Fermi.

  18. Mihoc biography
    • Octav Onicescu (1892-1983) had studied geometry under Tullio Levi-Civita in Rome before spending some time on a visit to Paris.

  19. Birkhoff biography
    • Among the European mathematicians his closest friends were Hadamard, Niels Norlund, Levi-Civita, and Whittaker.

  20. Weatherburn biography
    • An elementary account of Levi-Civita's theory of parallel displacements is given.

  21. Friedmann biography
    • Blumenthal, Karman and Levi-Civita got interested in my and my colleagues work.

  22. Rey Pastor biography
    • He also brought important foreign mathematicians to the university to give short courses, including: Frederigo Enriques (1925), Francesco Severi (1930), Tullio Levi-Civita (1937), Emile Borel (1928) and Jacques Hadamard (1930).

  23. Golab biography
    • Before submitting his thesis, Golab studied in Italy with Tullio Levi-Civita and E Bompiani, in Czechoslovakia with Ludwig Berwald, and also in Gottingen.

  24. Einstein biography
    • About 1912, Einstein began a new phase of his gravitational research, with the help of his mathematician friend Marcel Grossmann, by expressing his work in terms of the tensor calculus of Tullio Levi-Civita and Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro.

  25. Conforto biography
    • Taking Chisini's advice, in the autumn of 1928 Conforto entered the University of Rome where he attended lectures by Vito Volterra, Tullio Levi-Civita, Guido Castelnuovo and Federigo Enriques.

  26. Comessatti biography
    • In the same year he entered the University of Padua where he studied pure mathematics, taught by a number of excellent teachers including Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro, Tullio Levi-Civita, Giuseppe Veronese, and Francesco Severi who was appointed to Padua in 1905 when Comessatti was in his second year of study [Rend.

  27. Bianchi biography
    • During his time as editor other mathematicians who shared the editorial duties with him include Luigi Cremona, Ulisse Dini, Corrado Segre, Salvatore Pincherle, Tullio Levi-Civita and Francesco Severi.

  28. Enriques biography
    • He was elected to the Reale Accademia dei Lincei in 1906 and, in the following year, was awarded (together with Levi-Civita) the Royal Prize in Mathematics.

  29. Veronese biography
    • Castelnuovo, one of the greatest algebraic geometers of the Italian school, was his pupil in the mid 1880s and Levi-Civita was one of his pupils about ten years later.

  30. Eisenhart biography
    • The book gave a presentation of the existing theory of Riemannian geometry after a period of considerable study and development of the subject by Levi-Civita, Eisenhart, and many others.

  31. Kahler biography
    • The award of a Rockefeller fellowship enabled him to spend the academic year 1931-32 in Italy where he studied with Enriques, Castelnuovo, Levi-Civita, Severi, and Beniamino Segre.

  32. Beltrami biography
    • Beltrami indirectly influenced the development of tensor analysis by providing a basis for the ideas of Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita on the topic.

  33. Neugebauer biography
    • Levi-Civita, who was on the editorial board, was dismissed and Neugebauer, together with almost the whole of the editorial board, resigned.

  34. Pic biography
    • He submitted his thesis Despre invariantii adiabatici ai sistemelor neoronome in 1932 and he defended it before a committee chaired by Levi-Civita and eleven other professors including Vito Volterra who was a good friend of Romanian mathematicians.

  35. Struik biography
    • There Dirk worked with Levi-Civita and Ruth worked with Enriques.

  36. Grossmann biography
    • It was Grossmann who pointed out to him the relevance to general relativity of the tensor calculus which had been proposed by Elwin Bruno Christoffel in 1864, and developed by Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro and Tullio Levi-Civita around 1901.

  37. Wintner biography
    • He made two important visits during 1929-30, one to Rome where he worked with Levi-Civita, and the other to the observatory in Copenhagen where he worked with E Stromgren.

  38. Roth biography
    • The year in Italy was an extremely profitable time for Roth, for there he met many of the great Italian mathematicians and he learnt a great deal from Castelnuovo, Enriques, and Levi-Civita in addition to Severi.

  39. Weinstein biography
    • Weyl recommended Weinstein for a Rockefeller Fellowship and after this was awarded Weinstein spent 1926 and 1927 in Rome working with Levi-Civita.


History Topics

  1. General relativity
    • He consulted his friend Grossmann who was able to tell Einstein of the important developments of Riemann, Ricci (Ricci-Curbastro) and Levi-Civita.
      Go directly to this paragraph
    • In 1913 Einstein and Grossmann published a joint paper where the tensor calculus of Ricci and Levi-Civita is employed to make further advances.
      Go directly to this paragraph
    • This paper led to a correspondence between Einstein and Levi-Civita in which Levi-Civita pointed out technical errors in Einstein's work on tensors.
    • Einstein was delighted to be able to exchange ideas with Levi-Civita whom he found much more sympathetic to his ideas on relativity than his other colleagues.

  2. Quantum mechanics history

  3. Orbits


Famous Curves

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Societies etc

  1. Levi-Civita
    • Tullio Levi-Civita .

  2. Lunar features
    • (W) (L) Levi-Civita .

  3. Lunar features
    • Levi-Civita .

  4. Accademia dei Lincei
    • Niels Bohr, Tullio Levi-Civita, Guglielmo Marconi, Robert Millikan, Max Planck, Ernest Rutherford, Erwin Shrodinger, Francesco Severi, and Edmund Whittaker were all members of the Pontifical Academy of Sciences.

  5. Honorary Fellows of the EMS
    • 1930 Tullio Levi-Civita .

  6. Fellow of the Royal Society
    • Tullio Levi-Civita 1930 .

  7. Fellows of the RSE
    • Tullio Levi-Civita1923More infoMacTutor biography .

  8. Fellows of the RSE
    • Tullio Levi-Civita1923More infoMacTutor biography .

  9. LMS Honorary Member
    • 1924 T Levi-Civita .

  10. Fellows of the RSE
    • Tullio Levi-Civita1923More infoMacTutor biography .

  11. EMS Honorary Members
    • 1930 Tullio Levi-Civita .

  12. Sylvester Medal
    • 1922 Tullio Levi-Civita .

  13. EMS 1930
    • FIRST ROW SEATED, Dr Dougall, Prof Ince, Prof Noble, Dr Richmond, Prof Darwin, Mrs Turnbull, Prof Turnbull, Prof Levi-Civita, Prof Steggall, Prof Whittaker, Prof H F Baker, Mme Myller-Lebedeff, Dr Aitken, Prof Titchmarsh, Prof Myller, H S Ruse, Dr Copson .


References

  1. References for Levi-Civita
    • References for Tullio Levi-Civita .
    • http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9047978/Tullio-Levi-Civita .
    • T Levi-Civita, Opere matematiche.
    • T Levi-Civita, Opere matematiche.
    • T Levi-Civita, Opere matematiche.
    • T Levi-Civita, Opere matematiche.
    • T Levi-Civita, Opere matematiche.
    • C Agostinelli, Nel centenario della nascita di Tullio Levi-Civita, Atti Accad.
    • U Amaldi, Commemorazione del socio Tullio Levi-Civita, Atti Accad.
    • G Battimelli, 'With no official connection' : Tullio Levi-Civita and the International Congresses of Applied Mechanics, Riv.
    • U Bottazzini, Ricci and Levi-Civita : from differential invariants to general relativity, in The symbolic universe, Milton Keynes, 1996 (Oxford Univ.
    • A Buhl, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita, 1873-1941, Enseignement Math.
    • E Cartan, Notice sur M Tullio Levi-Civita, C.
    • C Cattani, Levi-Civita's influence on Palatini's contribution to general relativity, in The attraction of gravitation: new studies in the history of general relativity, Johnstown, PA, 1991 (Birkhauser Boston, Boston, MA, 1993), 206-222.
    • C Cattani and M De Maria, Geniality and rigor : the Einstein - Levi-Civita correspondence (1915-1917), Riv.
    • C Cattani and M De Maria, Einstein's path toward the generally covariant formulation of gravitational field equations: the contribution of Tullio Levi-Civita, in Proceedings of the fourth Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity, Part A, B, Rome, 1985 (North-Holland, Amsterdam, 1986), 1805-1826.
    • L Dell'Aglio, The role of applications in the works of Levi-Civita, Riv.
    • L Dell'Aglio and G Israel, The themes of stability and qualitative analysis in the works of Levi-Civita and Volterra (Italian), Italian mathematics between the two world wars (Pitagora, Bologna, 1987), 125-141.
    • L Dell'Aglio and G Israel, La theorie de la stabilite et l'analyse qualitative des equations differentielles ordinaires dans les mathematiques italiennes : le point de vue de Tullio Levi-Civita, in Cahiers du Seminaire d'Histoire des Mathematiques 10 (Univ.
    • A Einstein, Tullio Levi-Civita, Annuario della Pontificia Accademia delle Scienze 1 (1936-37), 496-511.
    • D Galletto, Tullio Levi-Civita (1873-1941) (Italian), Boll.
    • W V D Hodge, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita, J.
    • W V D Hodge, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita.
    • G Krall, Tullio Levi-Civita nella meccanica del suo tempo, Civilta delle Macchine 1 (4) (1953), 33-37.
    • G Krall, Tullio Levi-Civita e la relativita, Civilta delle Macchine 1 (6) (1953), 42-48.
    • B Levi, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita (1873-1941) (Spanish), Math.
    • A Masotti, Bibliografie di Tullio Levi-Civita e Vito Volterra, Rend.
    • M Montagnana, Tullio Levi-Civita nel centenario della nascita, Archimede 25 (1973), 318-322.
    • P Nastasi, Aspects of Tullio Levi-Civita's life in Rome (1919-1941), Riv.
    • P Nastasi and R Tazzioli, Toward a scientific and personal biography of Tullio Levi-Civita (1873-1941), Historia Math.
    • Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita (Spanish), Revista Ci., Lima 43 (1941), 683-685.
    • Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita, Ann.
    • R Ricca, The contributions of Da Rios and Levi-Civita to asymptotic potential theory and vortex filament dynamics, Fluid Dynam.
    • L Roth, Tullio Levi-Civita, Nature 149 (1942), 266.
    • H S Ruse, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita, Edinburgh Math.
    • C Somigliana, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita e Vito Volterra, Rend.
    • D J Struik, Schouten, Levi-Civita, and the emergence of tensor calculus, in The history of modern mathematics, Vol.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/References/Levi-Civita.html .

  2. References for Einstein
    • C Cattani and M De Maria, Einstein's path toward the generally covariant formulation of gravitational field equations : the contribution of Tullio Levi-Civita, in Proceedings of the fourth Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity (Amsterdam-New York, 1986), 1805-1826.
    • C Cattani and M De Maria, Gravitational waves and conservation laws in general relativity : A Einstein and T Levi-Civita, 1917 correspondence, in Proceedings of the Fifth Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity (Teaneck, NJ, 1989), 1335-1342.
    • C Cattani and M De Maria, The 1915 epistolary controversy between Einstein and Tullio Levi-Civita, in Einstein and the history of general relativity (Boston, MA, 1989), 175-200.

  3. References for Volterra
    • L Dell'Aglio and G Israel, The themes of stability and qualitative analysis in the works of Levi-Civita and Volterra (Italian), Italian mathematics between the two world wars (Bologna, 1987), 125-141.
    • A Masotti, Bibliografie di Tullio Levi-Civita e Vito Volterra, Rend.
    • C Somigliana, Obituary: Tullio Levi-Civita e Vito Volterra, Rend.

  4. References for Schouten
    • D J Struik, Schouten, Levi-Civita and the Emergence of Tensor Calculus, in David Rowe and John McCleary (eds.), History of Modern Mathematics Vol.

  5. References for Ricci-Curbastro
    • T Levi-Civita, Commemorazione del socio nazionale prof.

  6. References for Nalli
    • P Nastasi and R Tazzioli, Pia Nalli, Calendario della corrispondenza di Tullio Levi-Civita (1873-1941) con appendici di documenti inediti (Palermo, 1999), 381-409.

  7. References for Sundman
    • L Dell'Aglio, Lines of research in classical celestial mechanics : the three-body problem in Levi-Civita and Sundman (Italian), Physis Riv.


Additional material

  1. Tullio Levi-Civita

  2. Levi-Civita: 'Absolute Differential Calculus
    • Levi-Civita: Absolute Differential Calculus .
    • In 1925 Levi-Civita published Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto and, two years later an English translation appeared entitled The Absolute Differential Calculus (Calculus of Tensors).
    • Below we give a version of the Preface to the English edition which was written by Levi-Civita: .
    • TULLIO LEVI-CIVITA .
    • T LEVI-CIVITA.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Levi-Civita_Calculus.html .

  3. Levi-Civita: 'Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto
    • Levi-Civita: Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto .
    • In 1925 Levi-Civita published Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto and, two years later an English translation appeared entitled The Absolute Differential Calculus (Calculus of Tensors).
    • TULLIO LEVI-CIVITA.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Levi-Civita_Lezioni.html .

  4. Levi-Civita.html
    • TULLIO LEVI-CIVITA .
    • Tullio Levi-Civita, Honorary Member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, was born at Padua on March 29th, 1873, and died in Rome on December 29th, 1941.
    • Levi-Civita's work as a mathematician is notable for its quality, quantity and range.
    • Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita together developed this theory, and in 1901 published a joint memoir, "Methodes du calcul differentiel absolu et leurs applications" in the Mathematische Annalen (vol.
    • Originally it was a technique rather than a separate branch of mathematics, providing as it did a way of writing theorems of differential geometry and the calculus in a form at once concise and general, and it was not until after the development of relativity, followed shortly afterwards by Levi-Civita's definition of parallelism in Riemannian geometry, that it assumed the full place it now holds as one of the main branches of modern mathematics.
    • This discovery by Levi-Civita, together with the contemporary development of general relativity and the search for a unified theory of gravitation and electromagnetism by Weyl, Eddington, Einstein and others, quickly led to generalisations of Riemannian geometry.
    • In 1870 Felix Klein had defined a geometry to be the invariant theory of a transformation group, a definition which included such geometries as Euclidean, affine and projective, but did not include Riemannian, In the light of Levi-Civita's definition of parallelism it was seen that the spaces of differential geometry could, so to speak, be regarded as an assemblage of isomorphic, Klein spaces, each associated with a point of an "underlying space," and in this way there grew an extensive literature directly inspired by the work of Levi-Civita.
    • Levi-Civita himself, it is true, made no special contribution to these developments and it seems not unlikely that many of them could have held little interest for him being too far removed from the simple directness of his own work.
    • By his early work with Ricci on tensor analysis and by his later discovery of infinitesimal parallelism, Levi-Civita laid the foundations both for relativity and for the establishment of differential geometry as one of the great branches of modern mathematics.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Levi-Civita.html .

  5. EMS obituary
    • TULLIO LEVI-CIVITA .
    • Tullio Levi-Civita, Honorary Member of the Edinburgh Mathematical Society, was born at Padua on March 29th, 1873, and died in Rome on December 29th, 1941.
    • Levi-Civita's work as a mathematician is notable for its quality, quantity and range.
    • Ricci-Curbastro and Levi-Civita together developed this theory, and in 1901 published a joint memoir, "Methodes du calcul differentiel absolu et leurs applications" in the Mathematische Annalen (vol.
    • Originally it was a technique rather than a separate branch of mathematics, providing as it did a way of writing theorems of differential geometry and the calculus in a form at once concise and general, and it was not until after the development of relativity, followed shortly afterwards by Levi-Civita's definition of parallelism in Riemannian geometry, that it assumed the full place it now holds as one of the main branches of modern mathematics.
    • This discovery by Levi-Civita, together with the contemporary development of general relativity and the search for a unified theory of gravitation and electromagnetism by Weyl, Eddington, Einstein and others, quickly led to generalisations of Riemannian geometry.
    • In 1870 Felix Klein had defined a geometry to be the invariant theory of a transformation group, a definition which included such geometries as Euclidean, affine and projective, but did not include Riemannian, In the light of Levi-Civita's definition of parallelism it was seen that the spaces of differential geometry could, so to speak, be regarded as an assemblage of isomorphic, Klein spaces, each associated with a point of an "underlying space," and in this way there grew an extensive literature directly inspired by the work of Levi-Civita.
    • Levi-Civita himself, it is true, made no special contribution to these developments and it seems not unlikely that many of them could have held little interest for him being too far removed from the simple directness of his own work.
    • By his early work with Ricci on tensor analysis and by his later discovery of infinitesimal parallelism, Levi-Civita laid the foundations both for relativity and for the establishment of differential geometry as one of the great branches of modern mathematics.
    • http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/Extras/Levi-Civita_obituary.html .

  6. Marie-Louise Dubreil-Jacotin
    • Under the influence of the Norwegian school she became interested in the mathematical theory of waves in ideal liquids, in particular in the work of Levi-Civita.
    • At her first meeting with the renowned Levi-Civita, she told him about an important difference between the irrotational wave he had just described (of a ideal liquid with a free surface) and a rotational wave which Gerstner had described a long time before (the cycloidal wave).
    • Levi-Civita, surprised and interested, encouraged her to continue her studies.
    • She established the existence of an infinity of waves, those of Gerstner and Levi-Civita being two examples.

  7. Whittaker EMS Obituary.html
    • It was Whittaker, incidentally, who suggested to Levi-Civita that his book Lezioni di calcolo differenziale assoluto should be translated into English.

  8. Edinburgh Mathematical Notes
    • TULLIO LEVI-CIVITA .

  9. Jacques Hadamard's failures

  10. EMS obituary

  11. Publications of Corrado Segre
    • C Segre, Relazione sulla memoria del prof T Levi-Civita: Tipi di potenziali che si possono jar dipendere da due sole coordinate, Atti R.

  12. Publications of Corrado Segre
    • C Segre, Relazione sulla memoria del prof T Levi-Civita: Tipi di potenziali che si possono jar dipendere da due sole coordinate, Atti R.


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Chronology

  1. Mathematical Chronology
    • Levi-Civita publishes a paper developing the calculus of tensors.
    • Levi-Civita and Ricci-Curbastro publish Methodes de calcul differential absolu et leures applications in which they set up the theory of tensors in the form that will be used in the general theory of relativity 15 years later.

  2. Chronology for 1900 to 1910
    • Levi-Civita and Ricci-Curbastro publish Methodes de calcul differential absolu et leures applications in which they set up the theory of tensors in the form that will be used in the general theory of relativity 15 years later.

  3. Chronology for 1890 to 1900
    • Levi-Civita and Ricci-Curbastro publish Methodes de calcul differential absolu et leures applications in which they set up the theory of tensors in the form that will be used in the general theory of relativity 15 years later.

  4. Chronology for 1880 to 1890
    • Levi-Civita publishes a paper developing the calculus of tensors.


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JOC/BS August 2001